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Security

Specification vulnerability in devices that speak Bluetooth is addressed

The discovery of a flaw in Bluetooth specification that could enable an attack to spy on your information made news this week; the attacker could be able to weaken the encryption of Bluetooth devices and snoop on communications ...

Security

Move over, Paris. Sartorial hacking is le dernier cri

Not fashion chic; it is fashion cheek.

Engineering

Wireless sensors stick to skin and track health

We tend to take our skin's protective function for granted, ignoring its other roles in signaling subtleties like a fluttering heart or a flush of embarrassment.

Robotics

An evolutionary robotics approach for robot swarm cooperation

Recombination, the rearrangement of genetic materials as a result of mating or of combining segments of DNA from different organisms, has numerous evolutionary advantages. For instance, it allows organisms to remove deleterious ...

Robotics

Engineers show off Astro the robot dog

What would you get if you combined Apple's Siri and Amazon's Alexa with Boston Dynamic's quadraped robots? You'd get "Astro," the four-legged seeing and hearing intelligent robodog.

Energy & Green Tech

How buildings can cut 80% of their carbon emissions by 2050

Energy use in buildings—from heating and cooling your home to keeping the lights on in the office—is responsible for over one-third of all carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the United States. Slashing building CO2 emissions ...

Software

Amazon improves face analysis tech, adds fear

Amazon's image recognition software is now able to detect fear. Amazon Web Services announced this as part of an update note about its facial recognition software, Rekognition.

Consumer & Gadgets

Are Siri and Alexa making us ruder?

Is the way we bark out orders to digital assistants like Siri, Alexa and Google Assistant making us less polite? Prompted by growing concerns, two Brigham Young University information systems researchers decided to ask.

Robotics

Drones sensing by a whisker

A University of Queensland engineer has followed nature's example and developed whiskers for drones and robots, allowing machines to sense surroundings just as animals do.